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20110701
20110731
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is the person suspect? no. that's wrong. something that's a big, big mistake that they made. >> at a news conference today, ramirez's family chastized police for jumping to the wrong conclusion. >>> the news out of los angeles comes just as bryan stow's family announces signs of progress at san francisco general. according to the family's website, bryan opened and closed his eyes on command, gave what looked like a thumbs- up, and then mouthed, stow, when asked to say his last name. that said the family expects a long road ahead to recovery as well as justice. >> there's a lot of work to be done. we understand what a long road ahead it is for the lapd so we are just waiting for the legal process to take shape. >> bryan stow's condition is still listed as serious. we'll continue to post the latest developments on our website, cbssf.com. >>> just two days after they shouted their frustrations at san francisco's police chief, today some people in the bayview community confronted mayor ed lee. tensions are high after saturday's deadly shooting and some are skeptical about the report that the
're going to keep fighting this. this isn't over. it's completely unacceptable. >> time that we tell big companies they made an incredible amount of money and they are not paying taxes. it affects our school. >> reporter: they took their protest inside the meeting. the message was heard but the outcome disappointing. fees must go up. >> it's approved. it's going to happen. >> reporter: the regents approved a 9.6% tuition increase. that's on top of an 8% increase already approved bringing undergrad tuition to more than $12,000 a year. that's 18% higher than last year. and that's without room, board or books. >> we had to approve the increase, no choice, to preserve the quality of the university, the top priority. >> reporter: bottom line, university students like joseph silva will be strapped. >> i'm already working as a barista and server at my current job. wanted this tuition hike, i'm going -- and with this tuition hike, i'm just going to have to take more loans because i can't pay for it just with work, with the financial aid that i got, which makes grad school look unreasonable but w
a big gap in the funding. they might try to build a cheaper one. they -- i don't think they are going to be doing repairs. they don't even have the money for a fence. and not to you know -- can't sugar coat this. they said there's still probably more problems to come because the state now is going to start releasing prisoners early to the county. so more of the money has to go to the adult jails and so once again, there is a chance that the kids would -- >> and we just touched on the neighborhood around there and how they are impacted. thank you. >>> living in a dorm room is a rite of passage for most college freshman but san jose state is seeing one of the biggest incoming classes ever. and there isn't enough room to house everyone. as len ramirez reports, some students may be checking into hotels. len. >> reporter: that's right. they may be living in hotels because there's not enough room in some of these dorms that were built here in san jose state in the 1950s. san jose state used to be able to house all of the students who wanted to study and live here. but not anymore. it's the
on what happened to the man known as brother john. >> reporter: the people who knew him said he has a big heart and they are devastated. >> reporter: gave him fish and french fries. >> reporter: william holloway says the man he had come to know as brother john had just stopped by with a hot meal when somebody drove by in a van and opened fire. >> from that point on he shot three times and then two more shots. >> reporter: you heard five shots? >> five shots. the guy don't even know brother john. this is a random senseless shooting that should have never happened. if it hadn't been for brother john, they would have got shot. >> are you all right? >> yeah, i made it through. >> reporter: holloway says brother john has been bringing him food on the streets of east oakland for about a year, sometimes three days a week. >> he was a nice guy. him and his wife fixed the food at home and bring it out here to feed people. >> reporter: the shooting happened at 12:30 a.m. at 47th and san leandro. oakland police say the original report came into the chp when somebody flagged down an officer to report
of that, you know, and i think it's just a big impact. >> reporter: researchers eventually plan to expand this network of mini or citizen sensors to southern california, utah, the pacific northwest, and alaska. mark sayre, cbs 5. >>> to find out how you can volunteer, go to cbssf.com, click on news. >>> despite a forecast calling for rain and thick clouds, four astronauts blasted into space for the last flight of the shuttle atlantis. >> 3, 2, 1, 0, the final liftoff of atlantis! >> the crew is delivering a year's worth of supplies to the international space station and will haul away as much trash as it can. the crowd watching the historic flight at cape canaveral was estimated at nearly a million people. and a native of san carlos and cal grad is on board atlantis. rex walheim moving forward, though nasa will rely on the russians to ferry astronauts and supplies to the station. >>> lawrence karnow is in for roberta. and lawrence, you made that trek down to watch this shuttle launch, didn't you? >> yes. and i missed it, too. >> oh-oh! >> they scrubbed that mission. >> thank goodness t
illegal fireworks and they will be putting them in these big 55-gallon drums that you see here collecting them all from neighbors who drop them off but those same neighbors worry this may not take the spark out of illegal fireworks. long before the legal fireworks ever go up over the san francisco bay, they are already being set off on dry land. >> we hear lots of roman candles and the various fireworks, most of the evening, and into the night. >> reporter: it's become a stealth tradition. natasha smith told us where illegal fireworks are hidden in santa cruz. >> they bury their fireworks at the beach. then they come back and explode them at night. >> reporter: in oakland -- in oakland it's a yearly battle. >> it starts tonight. >> reporter: this year firefighters are trying something new not so different from an amnesty program. bring your illegal fireworks to the station. >> just ring the doorbell, the firefighters will take possession of them and place them in a 55-gallon drum. >> reporter: they questions asked. >> i'm not sure that it would be a program that works. people just want to
's a big detriment and blow to the future revitalization of the base. >> reporter: legislators must have known there would be a fight. hoff meister points out the law has a provision in it that says if cities sue like they are they don't get any money. >> death by one water drop at a time or by a whole bucket thrown on you at once. take your pick. >> reporter: to top it off, the state raided the vehicle license fee fund so every city lose out on some money. in concord that's $240,000 gone enough to pay for 2.5 police officers or three or four maintenance workers. in concord, ann notarangelo, cbs 5. >>> all right. i know one department that wasn't very business stayed. roberta, that was the complaint department. >> thank you very much. it was the first 4th of july in years that people weren't complaining about not being able to see the fireworks. rain in the valley from monsoonal moisture lifting up from southern california. this is a flood warning in effect for the mammoth lakes region, flood watch in nevada in kings county. this has caused thunderstorms with lightning. there is a slight
area alone. >> unauthorized immigrants are found throughout the state. they are not just the big areas that we expect to find them which is los angeles or san joaquin valley or agricultural areas. in the bay area, about 8% of the population is unauthorized and that's the same average in the state. >> reporter: researchers also confirm that illegal immigrants pay federal taxes taxes. the study relied on tax id numbers which many undocumented workers use to file tax returns since they don't have social security numbers. rural counties like monterey, san benito, napa and sonoma have some of the highest percentages of illegal immigrant residents. among bay area counties, santa clara and alameda had the highest percentages. >> i think the study has come out we haven't had like a real number. >> reporter: but the immigrant rights and education network in san jose thinks there are even more illegal immigrants because some are afraid to file tax returns. >> i think that might be a little bit more. i think that there's a lot of people that fear to a certain extent, you know, letting the govern
be a good time to buy. sluggish demand and lots of supply is pushing down prices on the big boxes. you can now find a 50" 3-d set for $400. that's less than half the cost it was just a year ago. and if you would rather read, the cost of a kindle continues to drop too. amazon now sells a version of its ebook for just $114, but do you have to put up with some advertising along with your reading. and there's word a $100 version is on the way. finally netflix. yes, customers were furious when the san jose company recently changeddist its pricing plan for the combo package but people with just one dvd at a time are seeing the price drop. netflix has slashed the cost of that service from $10 a month to just $8. now, some other things that are getting cheaper, prepaid debit cards. after a lot of complaints, some companies are reducing all those fees and the cost of in ground swimming pools has taken a dive. sales are down 75% so some pool makers are doing anything to get home owners to jump in. >> that's probably one thing you won't be getting. >> no. i don't have any room for it. >> on the house
been for some time, and the spending binge going on in washington is a big part of the reason why. before i served in congress, i ran a small business in ohio. i was amazed at how different washington, d.c. operated than every other business in america. for most american businesses make the hard choices to pay their bills live within their means, and in washington more spending and more debt is business as usual. well, i've got news for washington: those days are over. president obama came to congress in january and requested business as usual. he had another routine in increase in the national debt; but we in the house said "not so fast." here was a president asking for the largest debt increase in american history on the heels of the largest spending binge in american history, and here's what we got for that massive spending binge: a new health care bill that most americans never asked for, a stimulus bill that's more effective in producing material for late- night comedians than it was in producing jobs, and a national debt that has gotten so out of hard it sparked a crisis w
something was wrong early sunday morning. >> he was on top deck when he heard some noise and saw the big wave coming and he ran down to the cabin and woke everybody up. and by the time everybody came out, they were already in nine feet of water. there was no warning. if it wasn't for jim miller, the outcome would have been totally different. >> he saw how exhausted those survivors are. they were expected to be coming home two days ago but now they are going to stay and it's not clear how long. they are monitoring the search. they want their missing brethren to come back. >> joe, you mentioned that the captain wasn't arrested. but have we heard, is he cooperating with investigators? >> reporter: he is speaking with investigators and in fact, there was supposed to be a news conference this evening. we are not sure of the timetable on that but he was going to participate with that, as well. this was a sudden storm. roberta tells me whereas you can predict some storms, you can't predict the severity and this one hit like a whammy in the middle of the night. >> and massive waves. thank you, j
and says that he is open to that idea of a community meeting. but ken, the big question is whether or not these two agents will be open to it and whether or not the agency itself will let those agency be in any community setting a precedent for other communities in america. >> thank you. >>> a 14-year-old danville girl sexually assaulted in a park and police are looking for the suspect who resembles this sketch. the girl says she was walking past the tennis courts at diablo vista park last night when the man embraced her and touched her inappropriately. the girl pushed the man away and ran to the family car. the suspect is about 5'2" and approximatel 60 years old. >>> san bruno police are looking for whoever vandalized dozens of cars overnight in the rolling wood neighborhood. someone broke side view mirror, bent antennae and damaged windshield wipers on at least 29 cars. neighbors say it's usually a quiet neighborhood. >> we have never had this problem. i mean, we have had a little bit of vandalism but nothing like this. >> so far, there are no suspects in the vandalism. >>> the n
a six figure raise? >>> netflix tests its customers' loyalty. the new big fee you will have to pay for instant access. >> there may be restaurants that prefer to cater to such things. not here. >> no babies allowed! how one restaurant justifies banning your kids. school system's board approved a 12 percent fee hike. it >>> cal state students will pay more for tuition this year. the board approved a 12% fee hike this afternoon at a meeting. it takes effect this upcoming semester. csu says the higher tuition is necessary to make up for state budget cuts. but some students say the hikes make it impossible to afford an education. >> just two years ago, the fees were half as much as they are now. >> i think it's horrible because it's like we are trying to get an education and then all they are trying to do is make us pay more money. >> meanwhile today, governor jerry brown criticized the plan to increase the salary for san diego state's president by $100,000 when the school is asking students to pay more. incoming president elliot hirshman is set to
death quickly spread. linda? >> reporter: underage drinking is a big problem here, and authorities suspect now it took the life of a 14-year-old girl, a girl who was about to enter high school this fall. >> reporter: it was a sleepover with four teenager girls that turned deadly. the host died after drinking something mixed with soda. >> ones we found out what was inside the bottle, we can research further and do further investigation. >> police say the teenager took vodka from a kitchen cabinet and likely poured it into a water bottle. her parents were home and helped the girls when they woke up during the night feeling sick and throwing up. at first they thought it was food poisoning; but by morning, takemeh was dead, her friends in shock. >> i thought everybody was playing a joke. my friend called and told me. i said no, because he doesn't do that. i called everyone and they said it was true, and i looked on facebook, and her wall was filled. i was like "great." we just started crying. >> a facebook page mourning her death is filled with notes of sorrow. teenagers admit drinking
, julie watts shows us it happened to a homeowner in lafayette who then got hit with a big bill. >> reporter: you might not think that doing a lilliard work much could possibly go wrong, but yardwork plenty can go wrong. take a look. >> this being the culprit. >> reporter: robert isn't one to point fingers. but when it comes to this exposed pipeline this is apple orchard he says it's pg&e's responsibility. back in april, he was telling you his orchard when he hit a service line. >> very, very loud. >> reporter: just as surprising how close the pipe was to the surface. according to the picture just four inches underground. >> it's like a land mine in your yard. >> reporter: robert a retired plumper crimped the line himself to stop the gas flow and then called pg&e. the utility sent a crew along with a bill for $2,700. >> when i opened it up i almost threw it in the garbage. >> these kinds of accidents are entirely avoidable. >> reporter: pg&e says robert should have called 811 to find with your pipes are on their property before digging but robert says. >> nothing should be that
to not go back behind bars. no jail, no prison. the big picture for the state is tree dues the number of prisoners who go back to jail which is about 70% of all california prisoners. >> the idea behind the program is that if you return the jurisdiction, that is the control and responsibility as to how the offender does in the community back to the judges who originally sent the individual to prison, can you change things and get better outcomes? >> reporter: the judge has nearly 2,000 offenders he is personalitily watching over. his courtroom in santa clara county is one of six in the state testing his re-entry court theory where participants are provided housing -- >> can i go back to the prison. >> reporter: are required to stay in drug and alcohol treatment and keep their court dates. >> we do not send people back to prison. use very short jail time to remind them that they need to focus on what they were asked to do and do a better job the day they get out of jail. thus far it's effective. >> reporter: they are not all success stories. >> it means you're not going to be released
and counting. you have heard a lot of talk about the debt ceiling. so what is the big deal? mike sugerman turns to the basics of household budgeting to try to understand the government's money problems. >> reporter: the debt ceiling, a trillion here, a trillion there, it all adds up. what's it all about? >> oh, man i can't explain the debt ceiling debate. >> reporter: it might make your eyes glaze over and it seems complicated put it's simple. consider this couple. >> hello. >> hello. >> reporter: together they make $100,000 a year but they spend $140,000 an borrow the rest. to meet their budgets, they would have to cut back 40%. the u.s. is in the same position. the law only allows to borrow a certainly amount but that law has been changed 10 times in the past 10 years and the u.s. then borrowed more but now republicans say it's time to live within our means. do you really need to get your hair done so often? >> yes. what about the golf game and cigars. they cost a fortune. >> that's my relaxation. i'm not giving them up. >> reporter: so if they don't cut back we'll have to bring in more mone
. >> a big change of heart from two of the countries' biggest banks. >> a gold strike, the record nugget sold for a half million bucks, but now a new version of where it came from. and it may below the prospector's story apart. >>> lucky to be alive. the quick work to pull two dogs from a burning building. what made the flames so tough to fight. ,, denny's new tour of america menu. 50 star cuisine. the new tour of america menu. starting at $4.99. only at denny's. america's diner is always open. stain from an otherwise pristine wall-to-wall? or granted the christmas dreams of twins whose only wish was the shine of a professionally-cleaned hardwood floor? well, i have seen the glory of steam-cleaned kitchen tile in the early morning hours! i have saved floors. i have lived! also, we'll be passing a card around for carl. please sign it. ♪call 1-800-steemer. man: everybody knows you should save for retirement, but what happens when you're about to retire? woman: how do you go from saving to spending? fidelity helped us get to this point, and now we're talking about what comes next. man: we work
. so it's going to impact for sure and it's going to impact silicon valley and california in a big way because we have a lot of startups as now. >> reporter: it could be a big blow to investor confidence. >> if america's bond rating goes down, if america's credibility abroad goes down, that impacts how our businesses are perceived in very real ways and it can hurt them in their ability to run their businesses. >> reporter: mayor chuck reed says cities are bracing for the impact. bond rates could go up which could make financing infrastructure improvements like roads or sidewalks more expensive at a time when cities can least afford it. >> we are talking hundreds of millions of dollars of obligation and if the price goes up only 1% it could be millions of dollars additional cost to the city. >> reporter: how does that affect the citizens? >> with more money going into paying debt service that means there's less money for services and we have to cut from someplace else in our budget. >> reporter: san jose is one city with its own debt crisis looking at a deficit next year of $110 millio
,000 jobs in the past few months. more are coming. >> facebook and google have announced big employment increases in the valley to come in the next year. >> reporter: but even in tech there are winners and losers. networking giant cisco systems is cutting 6500 jobs. the economy in the rest of california and the nation is still sputtering. jobless claims rose by 10,000 nationwide last week. >> i don't think that we have hit a roadblock. i think that this economy will come back. >> reporter: u.s. signature of labor toured the valley transportation authority bus yard where the technology of the future is getting a test drive, hybrid buses made by hill ig and hayward. she calmed it a bright officer of the court economy and the recovery act which provided the stimulus funds needed to retrain-bus mechanics on the new technology not to mention the jobs created for the factory workers who build them. >> the creation of this vehicle is a green job. how many jobs go into building one us? >> 500. >> 500. that's 500 teamster members that were hoping to assemble a vehicle here. now they can't keep
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20